Foxtail millet as a new crop in Namibia: Varietal seed differences in germination

Abstract: 
Time of planting is a critical agronomic precedent to success or failure of a crop in the field. Any delay can drastically reduce yield or completely fail a crop given the influence of incongruent environmental factors such as temperature, moisture, oxygen, light and other factors that may bear on the extent of germination and seedling emergence. Emphasis is in effect often given to high-quality seed that has excellent genetic potential and good germination and vigorous seedling growth. In North Central Namibia where the seasonal summer rainfall on the highly sandy soils is variable, unpredictable and/or poorly distributed, early phase of growth starting at germination presents a major emergence and pre-anthesis challenges. Many farmers in this region are usually wary to sow seed even with the most trusted adapted pearl millet crop (Mahangu) until they are fairly sure that sowing time is promising. When not, most local farmers without irrigation options tend to abstain from sowing until the sandy soils are moist. From this study, indications are that any introduction work with foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.] as a new crop into a new region ought to be superseded by germination trials in order to adjust for seeding rates, but this must be done in connection with a sowing time that is supported by adequate soil moisture on a sandy soil.
Language: 
Date of publication: 
2016
Country: 
Region Focus: 
Southern Africa
University/affiliation: 
Volume: 
14
Number: 
Part 1
Pagination: 
599-607
Collection: 
RUFORUM Working document series
RUFORUM Conferences and Workshops
Form: 
Web resource
Publisher: 
ISSN: 
1607-9345
E_ISSN: 
Edition: