Tsetse Invasion as an Emerging Threat to Socioecological Resilience of Pastoral Communities in Karamoja, Uganda

Abstract: 
Over 70% of Uganda is infested by the tsetse fly, which has negative effects on human and livestock health. From colonial to post-independent Uganda, the Government of Uganda has worked to eradicate the tsetse menace. Despite these efforts, recent veterinary reports from the Karamojasub-regionhaveindicatedwidespreadtsetseinvasion. Thisstudyinvestigatedthepotential impact of tsetse invasion on the socioecological resilience of pastoral communities in the Karamoja sub-region. Results indicated that tsetse invasion is spreading from north to south of Karamoja. The tsetse transmission route emerging from southern Karamoja is perceived to be a continuation of the tsetse belt from West Pokot, Kenya. Cases of livestock deaths, livestock abortions, decreased milk yields, restricted access to prime grazing lands, heightened human-wildlife conflicts and disruption on crop cultivation have been reported. A computed socioecological resilience index in the study areawaspositivebutlow. Owingtothetransboundarycharacteristicsoftsetseinvasionsandsources and the associated documented effects, an urgent, strategic and system-wide intervention should be undertaken to control the tsetse invasion in this sub-region.
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Date of publication: 
2020
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Region Focus: 
East Africa
Collection: 
Other Papers, Posters and Presentations
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Form: 
Web resource
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Extent: 
26